Cheryl

Cheryl

After 10 years as a waitress, Cheryl is up to $2.40 an hour. On a good day, tips help her earn a living wage. Slow days with few customers make her want to cry. Health insurance isn't an option. It costs half her income and doesn't cover her severe migraines and anxiety. Without insurance, she couldn't afford a doctor to diagnose the cause of the dramatic weight loss that dropped her to 90 pounds. The team at the Augusta Regional Clinic came to the rescue and today Cheryl is healthier than she's been in years. Cheryl says: "I love my job and my customers. Without the medical care I needed, I'd have lost it all."

John

After decades of a successful career in sales, John found his job was phased out. With savings slipping away while he searched for new employment, he was suddenly struck down by Guillain–Barré syndrome – a rare and serious autoimmune disorder that attacks the nervous system. After being hospitalized for over a month, John came to the Arlington Free Clinic, weak and discouraged. Because he had access to the clinic's comprehensive medical services, John received care for multiple health issues and, in time, regained his strength and his health. His life has turned back around and he once again has access to health care outside of the free clinic. Now he gives back by serving as a volunteer and a donor. "I know what it's like on the other side. I never expected to need free health care, but I shudder to think where I'd be without the Clinic."

John
John

John

After decades of a successful career in sales, John found his job was phased out. With savings slipping away while he searched for new employment, he was suddenly struck down by Guillain–Barré syndrome – a rare and serious autoimmune disorder that attacks the nervous system. After being hospitalized for over a month, John came to the Arlington Free Clinic, weak and discouraged. Because he had access to the clinic's comprehensive medical services, John received care for multiple health issues and, in time, regained his strength and his health. His life has turned back around and he once again has access to health care outside of the free clinic. Now he gives back by serving as a volunteer and a donor. "I know what it's like on the other side. I never expected to need free health care, but I shudder to think where I'd be without the Clinic."

Suzanne

Suzanne

Until a few years ago, Suzanne had health insurance and a full-time job.  Then in 2005 Suzanne received the heartbreaking news that her mom had cancer.  Devastated, she took time off work to help care for her mom.  She was let go not long after, and lost her health insurance.  For the next few years Suzanne cared for her mom while struggling with health issues of her own.  High blood pressure and seizures from a car accident years earlier landed Suzanne in the hospital over and over, until she could no longer afford to provide for her own medical care.  Without any other option, Suzanne finally went to the Loudoun Free Clinic. During Suzanne’s first visit an alarming discovery was made that she had serious blockage that prevented blood from getting to her brain, leaving her at risk of stroke and even death. Two volunteer neurologists confirmed the diagnosis and she was scheduled for immediate surgery. Thanks to quick action and the generosity of their volunteers and community partners, Suzanne’s surgery was successful and she is on the road to recovery.

Pamela

Pamela

She works two jobs and six days a week — often until after midnight.  But Pamela, age 51, has no health insurance.  It ended when her marriage did.  The medicines required to control her hypertension, vertigo, rapid heartbeat and gastrointestinal issues cost $2,300 a month — far more than what she earns. The stress of working two jobs increases her blood pressure and makes things worse. The Gloucester Mathews Free Clinic has been Pamela's lifeline, providing her with the medical care and medicines she needs to control her illnesses and keep working.  "God help me if I couldn't work," she said, "because I'm all alone.  I'm all I've got."

Robert

Although his surgery for colon cancer had been successful, Robert's part time job didn't include access to health insurance. "I just didn’t know how I'd survive." This gifted, native Arlingtonian, who attended Berklee College of Music and the New England Conservatory of Music before carving out a niche in the New York music scene, had returned to Arlington several years ago to care for his elderly parents. Cancer was not in the plan. But as an Arlington Free Clinic patient, Robert received timely access to the cancer treatment he needed. "They didn’t just take me in. They embraced me. The Clinic saved my life."

Robert
Robert

Robert

Although his surgery for colon cancer had been successful, Robert's part time job didn't include access to health insurance. "I just didn’t know how I'd survive." This gifted, native Arlingtonian, who attended Berklee College of Music and the New England Conservatory of Music before carving out a niche in the New York music scene, had returned to Arlington several years ago to care for his elderly parents. Cancer was not in the plan. But as an AFC patient, Robert received timely access to the cancer treatment he needed. "They didn’t just take me in. They embraced me. The Clinic saved my life."

Tate

Tate

"I came to The Free Clinic of Danville when I was unemployed and without insurance. I needed care for my diabetes and high blood pressure but was unable to afford the cost of a doctor’s visit and medications. The Free Clinic staff welcomed me then just like they do now. They are professional and courteous and I consider them just like family. They have been a great health care provider for me and for so many in our community and ‘free’ doesn’t mean you get less care, I feel I get better service than I would with insurance. They motivate me to take care of myself through the fitness programs and educational classes they provide. I’ve learned how lifestyle changes such as exercise and proper nutrition can help me live longer and stronger. That motivates me to help others. As a Pastor, I take this message into the community as my personal testimony that if you want to improve your health – you can. The Free Clinic has given me a chance to be healthy and stay healthy."

Pamela

She works two jobs and six days a week — often until after midnight.  But Pamela, age 51, has no health insurance.  It ended when her marriage did.  The medicines required to control her hypertension, vertigo, rapid heartbeat and gastrointestinal issues cost $2,300 a month — far more than what she earns. The stress of working two jobs increases her blood pressure and makes things worse. The Gloucester Mathews Free Clinic has been Pamela's lifeline, providing her with the medical care and medicines she needs to control her illnesses and keep working.  "God help me if I couldn't work," she said, "because I'm all alone.  I'm all I've got."

Pamela